Topanga Actors Company Mounts Its Fourth Season

Patrick Skelton and Sylvia Folesteanu perform a scene from The Clean House. Photo by Paula LaBrot

Topanga Actors Company (TAC) a local, resident theater company whose mission is to bring modern theater works to Topanga, is hosting a meet and greet on March 23, 1-4 pm., in the Topanga Library meeting room, to celebrate its fourth season and meet people who might like to be involved.

TAC has been presenting staged readings of cutting-edge plays performed by talented members of our community at the Topanga Library, and is proud to be mounting its fourth season.

TAC’s 2019 season is around the corner and kicks off with two events; the Open House on March 23, and a staged reading of Paula Vogel’s Pulitzer prize-winning play, How I Learned to Drive, April 13 and 14.   

Later in the season TAC will present Topanga’s first Ten-Minute Play Festival featuring a cornucopia of short plays by playwrights in and outside the United States. The season continues and concludes with a second full-length play and a holiday production.

TAC strives to be an inclusive organization where talent of all kinds is welcome. We are looking for actors and directors, help with house management, stage management, sound, graphic design, publicity, and fundraising.

At the Open House, we will have information about TAC and especially about volunteering for the upcoming Ten-Minute Play Festival projected for Fall 2019. TAC’s founding producers and the director of our next production will be on hand to answer questions.   

There will be greater demands and lots of opportunities this season with the ambitious Ten- Minute Play Festival added to the schedule. It takes a village!  

Our productions are open to actors of all levels of experience. If you need more details or have a question, please e-mail TAC producer Judith Hendra, judithhendra3@gmail.com n

 

SAVE THE DATE:

Saturday, April 13, and Sunday, April 14, for How I Learned to Drive by Paula Vogel, directed by Stephen Hoye.

Vogel’s masterpiece, a memory play set in the 1960s American South, is about the relationship of a teenage girl and her uncle by marriage. One of the most praised American plays of the 1990s, Drive is wildly funny, genuinely disturbing, sweet, forgiving, and unforgettable.

 

By Paula LaBrot and Judith Hendra, TAC Founders

 

Paula LaBrot
Paula LaBrot

Paula LaBrot is a 30-year resident of Topanga, a futurist with a special interest in the uncharted waters of cyberspace. plabrot@messengermountainnews.com

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